Loreena McKennitt Let Us The Infant Greet

Let us the Infant greet

In worship before Him fall

And let us pay Him homage meet

On this His festival.

Let us to the Infant sing

And bring Him of gifts rich store

Let us honour our Infant King

With praise for evermore.

Let us to the Infant kneel

And love Him with faithful love

And let our joyous anthems peal

For Him who reigns above.

Glad hymns in the Infant’s laud

Sing we to Him while we may

In heaven where He is throned as God

Our service He will pay.

Be we to the Infant true

While we are dwelling on mould

And He will give us our wages due

A crown of purest gold.

Loreena McKennitt As I Roved Out

Who are you, my pretty fair maid,

Who are you, me honey?

And who are you, my pretty fair maid,

And who are you, me honey?

She answered me quite modestly, I am me mother’s darling

With me

Too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh

And will you come to me mother’s house,

When the moon is shining clearly?

And will you come to me mother’s house

When the moon is shining clearly?

I’ll open the door and I’ll let you in

And divil ‘o one will hear us

With me

Too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh

So I went to her house in the middle of the night

When the moon was shining clearly

So I went to her house in the middle of the night

When the moon was shining clearly

She opened the door and she let me in and divil the one did hear us

With me

Too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh

She took me horse by the bridle and the bit

And led him to the stable

She took me horse by the bridle and the bit

And led him to the stable

Saying “There’s plenty of oats for a soldier’s horse,

To eat it if he’s able”

With me

Too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh

Then she took me by the lily-white hand

Led me to the table

Then she took me by the lily-white hand

Led me to the table

Saying “There’s plenty of wine for a soldier boy,

To drink if he is able”

With me

Too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh

Then I got up and I made the bed

I made it nice and aisy

Then I got up and I made the bed

I made it nice and aisy

The I got up and I laid her down

Saying “Lassie, are you able? “

With me

Too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh

And there we lay till the break of day

Divil the one did hear us

And there we lay till the break of day

And divil the one did hear us

Then I arose and put on me clothes

Saying “Lassie, I must leave you”

With me

Too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh

And when will you return again

When will we get married?

And when will you return again

When will we get married?

When broken shells make Christmas bells

We might then get married

With me

Too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh

Loreena McKennitt Samain Night

When the moon on a cloud cast night

Hung above the tree tops’ height

You sang me of some distant past

That made my heart beat strong and fast

Now I know I’m home at last

You offered me an eagle’s wing

That to the sun I might soar and sing

And if I heard the owl’s cry

Into the forest I would fly

And in its darkness find you by.

And so our love’s not a simple thing

Nor our truths unwavering

But like the moon’s pull on the tide

Our fingers touch, our hearts collide

I’ll be a moonsbreath by your side.

Loreena McKennitt In Praise Of Christmas

All hail to the days that merit more praise

Than all the rest of the year

And welcome the nights that double delights

As well for the poor as the peer!

Good fortune attend each merry man’s friend

That doth but the best that he may

Forgetting old wrongs with carols and songs

To drive the cold winter away.

Tis ill for a mind to anger inclined

To think of small injuries now

If wrath be to seek, do not lend her your cheek

Nor let her inhabit thy brow

Cross out of thy books malevolent looks

Both beauty and youth’s decay

And wholly consort with mirth and sport

To drive the cold winter away.

This time of the year is spent in good cheer

And neighbours together do meet

To sit by the fire, with friendly desire

Each other in love to greet

Old grudges forgot are put in the pot

All sorrows aside they lay

The old and the young doth carol this song

To drive the cold winter away.

When Christmas’ tide comes in like a bride

With holly and ivy clad

Twelve days in the year much mirth and good cheer

In every household is had

The country guise is then to devise

Some gambols of Christmas play

Whereat the young men do the best that they can

To drive the cold winter away.

Loreena McKennitt Annachie Gordon

Harking is bonny and there lives my love

My heart lies on him and cannot remove

It cannot remove for all that I have done

And I never will forget my love Annachie

For Annachie Gordon he’s bonny and he’s bright

He’d entice any woman that e’er he saw

He’d entice any woman and so he has done me

And I never will forget my love Annachie

Down came her father and he’s standing at the door

Saying Jeannie you are trying the tricks of a whore

You care nothing for a man who cares so much for thee

You must marry Lord Sultan and leave Annachie

For Annachie Gordon is barely but a man

Although he may be pretty but where are his lands

The Sultan’s lands are broad and his towers they run high

You must marry Lord Sultan and leave Annachie.

With Annachie Gordon I beg for my bread

And before I marry Sultan his gold to my head

With gold to my head and straight down to my knee

And I’ll die if I don’t get my love Annachie

And you who are my parents to church you may me bring

But unto Lord Sultan I’ll never bear a son

To a son or a daughter I’ll never bow my knee

And I’ll die if I don’t get my love Annachie.

Jeannie was married and from church was brought home

When she and her maidens so merry should have been

When she and her maidens so merry should have been

She goes into her chamber and cries all alone.

Come to bed my Jeannie my honey and my sweet

To stile you my mistress it would be so sweet

Be it mistress or Jeannie it’s all the same to me

But in your bed Lord Sultan I never will lie

And down came her father and he’s spoken with renown

Saying you who are her maidens

Go loosen up her gowns

And she fell down to the floor

And straight down to his knee saying

Father look I’m dying for my love Annachie.

The day that Jeannie married was the day that Jeannie died

And the day that young Annachie came home on the tide

Saying oh it’s been so long, you’ve been so long on the sands

So long on the sands, so long on the flood

They have married your Jeannie and now she lies dead.

You who are her maidens come take me by the hand

And lead me to the chamber where my love she lies in

And he kissed her cold till his heart it turned to stone

And he died in the chamber where his love she lies in.

Loreena McKennitt Snow

White are the far-off plains, and white

The fading forests grow;

The wind dies out along the height,

And denser still the snow,

A gathering weight on roof and tree,

Falls down scarce audibly.

The road before me smooths and fills

Apace, and all about

The fences dwindle, and the hills

Are blotted slowly out;

The naked trees loom spectrally

Into the dim white sky.

The meadows and far-sheeted streams

Lie still without a sound;

Like some soft minister of dreams

The snow-fall hoods me round;

In wood and water, earth and air,

A silence everywhere.

Save when at lonely intervals

Some farmer’s sleigh, urged on,

With rustling runners and sharp bells,

Swings by me and is gone;

Or from the empty waste I hear

A sound remote and clear;

The barking of a dog, or call

To cattle, sharply pealed,

Borne echoing from some wayside stall

Or barnyard far afield;

Then all is silent and the snow falls

Settling soft and slow

The evening deepens and the grey

Folds closer earth and sky

The world seems shrouded, far away.

Its noises sleep, and I secret as

Yon buried streams plod dumbly on and dream.

Loreena McKennitt The Parting Glass

Of all the money that here I spent, I spent it in good company

And of all the harm that here I’ve done, alas was done to none but me

And all I’ve done for want of wit, to memory now I can’t recall

So fill to me the parting glass. Goodnight and joy be with you all.

Oh, if I had money enough to spend and leisure time to sit awhile

There’s a fair young man in this town that sorely has my heart beguiled

His rosy cheeks and lovely lips, alone he has my heart in thrall

So fill to me the parting glass. Goodnight and joy be with you all.

Of all the comrades that here I’ve had, they’re sorry for my going away,

And of all the sweethearts that here I had, they wish me one more day to stay,

But since it falls unto my lot that I should rise and you should not,

I will gently rise and softly call. Goodnight and joy be with you all.

Loreena McKennitt Seeds Of Love

I sowed the seeds of love

I sowed them in the spring

I gathered them up in the morning so clear

When the small birds so sweetly sing

When the small birds so sweetly sing

The gardener was standing by

I asked him to choose for me

He chose for me the violet, the lily and the pink

But those I refused all three

But those I refused all three

The violet I did not like

Because it bloomed so soon

The lily and the pink I really over-think

So I thought I would wait till June

So I thought I would wait till June

In June there was a red rose bud

That is the flower for me

I often times have plucked that red rose bud

Till I gained the willow tree

Till I gained the willow tree

The willow tree will twist

The willow tree will twine

I often have wished I was in the young man’s arms

Who once had the arms of mine

Who once had the arms of mine

I sowed the seeds of love

I sowed them in the spring

I gathered them up in the morning so soon

When the small birds so sweetly sing

When the small birds so sweetly sing

Loreena McKennitt The Death Of Queen Jane

Queen Jane lay in labor full nine days or more

‘Til her women grew so tired, they could no longer there

They could no longer there

“Good women, good women, good women that you may be

Will you open my right side and find my baby?

And find my baby

“Oh no,” cried the women, “That’s a thing that can never be

We will send for King Henry and hear what he may say

And hear what he may say”

King Henry was sent for, King Henry did come

Saying, “What does ail you my lady? Your eyes, they look so dim

Your eyes, they look so dim”

“King Henry, King Henry, will you do one thing for me?

That’s to open my right side and find my baby

And find my baby”

“Oh no, cried King Henry, “That’s a thing I’ll never do

If I lose the flower of England, I shall lose the branch too

I shall lose the branch too”

There was fiddling, aye, and dancing on the day the babe was born

But poor Queen Jane beloved lay cold as the stone

Lay cold as the stone